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Discover how to keep them crisp, tight, and action packed!

When I write book marketing copy for authors or marketing content for business coaches, there are a few areas where I really focus my time and attention.

Two of those areas are headlines and bullet points. When writing marketing messages, strong headlines are what grab readers and drive them into your body copy.

Once you have readers engaged in your body copy, you need to convey the benefits of your book or program.

As I often say, benefits are the “yeah-so-what’s-in-it-for-me” aspect of your book or program, and it’s what your audience cares about the most.

One of the best ways to communicate the benefits of your book or program are through sharp and concise bullet points.

However, there’s a way to write them and a way not to write them. This week’s tip is about how to write bullet points that instantly grab the attention of your audience.

To find out how to make your bullet points pop off the page, click through
and check out this week’s Book Marketing Copy Quick Tip video.

 

 

Focus on Brevity and Action

In this week’s video, I get into more detail about how to write better bullet points, so I encourage you to watch it.

When you do, you’ll hear me talk about the importance of having your bullet points flow smoothly from the body copy that precedes them.

You’ll also learn why you should start your bullets with action words, and why you want to keep your bullets tight and concise.

In addition, I review the following two examples and tell you what makes the Bad Bullets example bad, and the Good Bullets example good.

So please check out this week’s video for more detail!

BAD BULLETS EXAMPLE

In Five Minutes for Fundraising, Martin Leifeld reveals insights you can use that have helped him raise nearly $500 million dollars for the non-profit organizations he’s served.

Through his experience and the wisdom shared by 26 of today’s most successful fundraisers, you’ll learn:

● How to ask for major gifts with ease and confidence
● What it takes to build key donor relationships
● The things you should know to optimize your organization’s fundraising abilities
● Practices that align with today’s most persuasive fundraisers

GOOD BULLETS EXAMPLE

In Five Minutes for Fundraising, Martin Leifeld reveals insights you can use that have helped him raise nearly $500 million dollars for the non-profit organizations he’s served.

Through his experience and the wisdom shared by 26 of today’s most successful fundraisers, you’ll gain the skills you need to …

● Ask for major gifts with ease and confidence
● Understand how to cultivate key donor relationships
● Assess and optimize your organization’s fundraising abilities
● Establish practices that align with today’s most persuasive fundraisers

In the Good example, you can see how the bullet points flow smoothly from the line that precedes them, have rhythm, and communicate benefits in a sharp and concise manner.

Each bullet begins with an action word, giving this set of bullets a more energized and active feel.

Our Bad Bullet points on the other hand are not terrible, but they have a clunky and choppy feel to them.

As I said earlier, a well-written set of bullet points is a great way to communicate the benefits of your book or online program.

If you follow the tips I’ve provided here, your bullets will have more punch to them.

Again, this week’s video goes into more depth and detail on this topic, so I encourage you to check it out.

Until next week, take action and make things happen!

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Will this post make it easier for you to write special offer marketing messages for your book? Please leave a comment and let me know!

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